The Hand of Stalin

Documentary
2 x 58 mins, 1990
Leningradskaya – A Village in Southern Russia and Leningrad – the opening two films of the trilogy use first person accounts to reveal the tragic details of the famine and political persecution suffered under Stalin’s regime. (October Films, PTV Productions, BBC broadcast)

Awards/Nominations

  • Gemini Award – Best Documentary Director
  • Earth Peace International Film Festival – Special Merit Award
  • Royal Television Society Nomination – Best Series
  • British Press Guild Nominatioin – Best Series
  • Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television Nomination – Best Series
  • Gemeaux nominations – Best Documentary, Best Director of Photography in all categories

Credits: Episode 1

  • Director: John Walker
  • Cinematographer: John Walker, csc
  • Editor: Steve Stevenson
  • Sound: John Martin
  • Series Producer: Tom Roberts
  • Associate Producer: Angus Macqueen
  • Executive Producer: Bill Nemtin
  • Production Company: PTV Productions/October Films for BBC Television

Credits: Episode 2

  • Director: John Walker
  • Cinematographer: John Walker, csc
  • Editors: Peter Lindley, Simon Price
  • Sound: John Martin
  • Music: Ilona Sekacz
  • Series Producer: Tom Roberts
  • Producer: Angus Macqueen
  • Executive Producer: Bill Nemtin
  • Production Company: PTV Productions/October Films for BBC Television

 

The Toronto Star on The Hand of Stalin

/ The Toronto Star

"Nothing so powerfully demonstrates the thesis of “the banality of evil” as the British-made mini series The Hand of Stalin."

London's Daily Mail on The Hand of Stalin

/ London's Daily Mail

"The Hand of Stalin is oral history at its most devastating."

Broadcast UK on The Hand of Stalin

/ Broadcast UK

"John Walker’s evocative opening film about the effects of collectivization in the village of Leningradskya was a masterpiece."

The Sunday Correspondent on The Hand of Stalin

/ The Sunday Correspondent

"John Walker’s extraordinary direction, visually stunning in its portrayal of landscape, concentrating in its depiction of human grief on the still faces of individuals, told more than words. And these, God help them, are the survivors. The lucky ones."

Daily Telegraph on The Hand of Stalin

/ Daily Telegraph

"On Lenigradskya (This) is the most haunting film about Russia to reach our screens in the glasnost era."